Jekyll on Heroku

Jekyll, the static website generator written in Ruby and popularized by GitHub, is a great candidate for being run on Heroku. Originally built to run on GitHub Pages, running Jekyll on Heroku allows you to take advantage of Jekyll’s powerful plugin system to do more than convert Markdown to HTML. On my blog, I have plugins to download my Goodreads current and recently read books and to generate Open Graph images for posts. That said, it’s not straightforward to get up and running on Heroku without using jekyll serve to do the heavy lifting. jekyll serve uses Ruby’s built-in, single threaded web server WEBrick, but a public site should be using a web server more suited for production, like nginx.

We’ll start from the very beginning. You’ll need Ruby and Bundler installed.

I like ruby-install and chruby as my Ruby installer and switcher.

This is the platform-agnostic way

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