Meet Volt, A Promising Ruby Framework For Dynamic Applications

By Amaury Andres Peniche Gonzalez – Software Engineer at Toptal

Amaury Andres Peniche GonzalezAmaury is a systems and production engineer with experience in front and back-end development, computer graphics, and networking. Amaury currently works as a freelance Ruby engineer at Toptal, where he was involved in numerous projects, mainly related to Ruby on Rails.

Ruby and the Volt framework

Volt is a Ruby web framework designed for data rich applications. Both the server and client sides are written in Ruby (which is then compiled to JS using OPAL), so this allows the developer to write very dynamic applications without having to write a single line of Javascript code. If you’re a Ruby fan like me, you’ll love this framework.

In an attempt to make web applications a lot more dynamic, front-end Javascript frameworks like Angular.js, Backbone.js and Ember.js have gained a lot of popularity. However, these frameworks often require a back-end application to be useful, so they are used in conjunction with web frameworks like Ruby on Rails and Django.

On the other hand, Volt is capable of managing the back-end and a dynamic front-end. Since both functionalities are tightly integrated into its core (in fact, Volt is more like an MVVM architecture, leveraging the advantages of data bindings), it enables the developer to build these applications quickly.

A very cool feature that comes out of the box is Volt’s real-time feature. If you ever made real-time applications, you know the process can be challenging – you probably implemented AJAX-polling, web sockets, Server-Sent Events (SSE) or even used external services, adding complexity to the application and even incurring additional costs.

Continue reading “Meet Volt, A Promising Ruby Framework For Dynamic Applications”

Learn Ruby programming – 59th batch

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s long-awaited and popular Ruby programming course. This is an intensive, online course for beginners that helps you get started with Ruby programming. The course starts on Saturday, 21st Feb. 2015 and runs for seven weeks.

Course Fee and Discount

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

Note: If you do not have a PayPal account and would like to pay by credit card on PayPal then do email me at satish [at] rubylearning.org.


Download ‘Advice for Ruby Beginners’ as a .zip file.

Here is what Sandra Randall (Butler), a participant who just graduated, has to say – “You kindly offered me the opportunity to join your Ruby course. I’m new to development and found the course, even though basic for programmers, a little tricky for me. I managed to complete all of the assessments and really learnt a lot. Thank you very much for the opportunity. It has really given me the push I needed to learn Ruby and I’m currently treading my way through both the pickaxe and Agile Development books and enjoying it. I’ve recently been offered a position as a Junior Systems Developer at a local Software house in South Africa – all thanks to the push you gave me which gave me the motivation and drive to get going.

Ruby
Paypal

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RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) – Reprint

Note: This article first appeared on 8th Oct. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2)

By Chris Strom

Thank you for the very encouraging response to the first-everRuby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)“. The second Ruby challenge is from Chris Strom.

About Chris Strom

Chris StromChris Strom (twitter / blog) in his day job, is the Director of Software Engineering for mdlogix, a small company in Baltimore, Maryland. They develop software that manages clinical research trials and associated data. They primarily code with Ruby on Rails. His background is in web development, mostly in Perl until ~2005 when he made the switch to Ruby.

Chris has this to say about the challenge:

RPCFN is a good idea as reading books and documentation can only take you so far when

Railsware for premium-quality web applications
RPCFN
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Continue reading “RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) – Reprint”

RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) – Reprint

Note: This article first appeared on 8th Oct. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2)

By Chris Strom

Thank you for the very encouraging response to the first-everRuby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)“. The second Ruby challenge is from Chris Strom.

About Chris Strom

Chris StromChris Strom (twitter / blog) in his day job, is the Director of Software Engineering for mdlogix, a small company in Baltimore, Maryland. They develop software that manages clinical research trials and associated data. They primarily code with Ruby on Rails. His background is in web development, mostly in Perl until ~2005 when he made the switch to Ruby.

Chris has this to say about the challenge:

RPCFN is a good idea as reading books and documentation can only take you so far when learning a new language. To really learn, you need to use the language. RPCFN provides a fabulous forum for using Ruby in the form of regular, engaging (but not arcanely difficult) challenges. Better yet, it provides feedback on how to use Ruby well, as each fortnight the best solution to a challenge is chosen. RPCFN is a wonderful introduction to the Ruby language and to the Ruby community. Welcome newbies!

Railsware for premium-quality web applications
RPCFN
Winners
Update

Continue reading “RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) – Reprint”

Felipe Elias Philipp Winner RPCFN #1 (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 8th Oct. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

In this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Felipe Elias Philipp of Brazil, winner of the first-ever Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies.

Felipe Elias Philipp

Satish>> Welcome Felipe and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self?

Felipe>> Thanks Satish for the opportunity. Well, about me… I’m a Brazilian guy, a web developer and a Mac user. I’m 22 years old and I started to program at school, since I was 16. Since then, programming has become my life and I can’t imagine myself doing any other thing.

Satish>> How did you get involved with Ruby programming?

Felipe>> I discovered Ruby through Rails on a well-known website by Brazilians: iMasters. I was just amazed as it was so easy to understand the Ruby code and I could solve the problems in a very simple way. This got me very motivated and I became more interested in the subject.

Continue reading “Felipe Elias Philipp Winner RPCFN #1 (Reprint)”

RPCFN: Shift Subtitle (#1) – Reprint

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

RPCFN: Shift Subtitle (#1)

By Fabio Akita

Note: This article first appeared on 24th Sept. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly ( bi-weekly / every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” in Ruby. Thanks to YOU, the Ruby community, people like Fabio Akita and companies like Locaweb who make all of this possible.

About Fabio Akita

Fabio AkitaFabio Akita is a Brazilian Rails enthusiast, also known online as “AkitaOnRails”. He regularly write posts on his own blog and had published the very first book tailored for the Brazilian audience called “Repensando a Web com Rails”.

He is now a full-time Ruby on Rails developer working as Project Manager at Locaweb, Brazil. He’s also the creator of the “Rails Summit Latin America“, the largest international Rails event in South America.

Fabio has this to say about the challenge:

If you’re learning a new language such as Ruby, it is important that you practice it. And the best way to start is by scratching your own itch. Anything goes. It’s not unusual to start by writing simple command line scripts to help out your everyday routine. That’s why I thought of a very trivial exercise in the first challenge. It should demand that you know the basics for a variety of Ruby subjects such as regular expressions, file manipulation, time calculation and so on.

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RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (Reprint)

RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

Note: This article first appeared on 20th Sept. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly (every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” that starts on Friday, 25th Sept. 2009.

What Is The RPCFN?

RPCFN

The RPCFN is a fortnightly (every 14 days) programming challenge for Ruby Newbies in the spirit of the Ruby Quiz. A new RPCFN will be posted on this RubyLearning blog every alternate Friday, starting 25th Sept. 2009. The contest is open to individuals only and you are invited to contribute solution(s) and/or discussion(s) as comments to the respective blog post. 13 days after the RPCFN is posted (i.e. on a Thursday), all the solutions will be thrown open for everyone to see and comment upon. The next day i.e. Friday, the cycle begins again. The Ruby working solution(s) should be clear-cut, follow Ruby conventions and still be easy to understand.

Continue reading “RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (Reprint)”

What are the Twelve Rules of Sinatra? (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 19th July. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

The Twelve Rules of Sinatra

The Twelve Rules of Sinatra: Download this as a Free Report.

Recently, I was reading Scott Adams’ (of Dilbert fame) blog post “Rule of Twelve” where he stated:

The Rule of Twelve states that if you know twelve concepts about a given topic you will look like an expert to people who only know two or three. If you learn more than twelve concepts about a topic, the value of each additional one drops off considerably. Allow me to be the first to confess that twelve is not a magic and inviolable number.

He also wrote a follow-up post to support his statement: “Twelve Rules of Energy Efficient Building“.

This made me wonder, could we apply the same “Rule of Twelve” to Sinatra?

Jeremy EvansHere is Jeremy Evans’ take on this:

  1. Just like Rails, keep your controller/actions simple, and put most of your business logic in your models. This makes testing and code reuse easier.
  2. Also like Rails, avoid excess logic in your views.

    Continue reading “What are the Twelve Rules of Sinatra? (Reprint)”

Poll: Ruby Problems for Beginners and Prizes (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 13th Sept. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

Poll: Ruby Problems for Beginners and Prizes

Many RubyLearning participants wrote in asking RubyLearning to start a weekly post containing a problem to be solved using Ruby. A problem will be posted here every week / fortnight and anyone is free to offer their solution (the solution should be clear-cut, follow Ruby conventions and still be easy to understand) as a comment to the blog post. A small panel will evaluate the solutions received and decide the best amongst them all. The person with the best solution will be awarded a token prize which could be a Peepcode or a Pragmatic screencast or something equivalent. Maybe some sponsors could chip in with some prizes!

RPCFN

RubyLearning is open to this idea and will start the same provided there is a good response to this. There’s a single question poll below which please answer and what’s more important is to post your thoughts, suggestions etc. as comments to this blog post.

We do have the Ruby Quiz, a weekly programming challenge for Ruby programmers. What’s also needed is something for programmers starting off with Ruby. Maybe RubyLearning could provide this.

We look forward to your response(s) and thoughts, suggestions (thoughts on the nature of the Ruby problem to be asked, evaluation criteria etc.

Continue reading “Poll: Ruby Problems for Beginners and Prizes (Reprint)”

Interview: Aaron Quint on Sinatra (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 20th March 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint.

On the eve of the first ever online “Introduction to Sinatra” course, Satish Talim of RubyLearning caught up with Aaron Quint and talked to him on Sinatra, in this interview.

Aaron Quint, USA

Satish Talim>> Welcome, Aaron and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self?

Aaron Quint>> Thanks for having me! I’m a freelance Ruby developer working in Brooklyn, NY. I’ve been doing Ruby and Rails for a little over 3 years now, and full time for the last 2 and a half. Recently I’ve been getting a lot more involved with the open source community. I really love coding in Ruby and at this point I don’t think any other language has such a great community with such smart and interesting people. I blog (as much as I can) at http://quirkey.com/blog/. My other passions are food and design and I work with a friend writing about this at http://thescoutmag.com.

Sinatra’s greatest strength is its flexibility

Sinatra Icon

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20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra – Do you? (Reprint)

Note: This first appeared on 29th June 2009 and is being reprinted as the original is not accessible.

20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra – Do you?

With Sinatra you can quickly create your own tiny web-applications in Ruby and write lots of small services. RubyLearning caught up with some Rubyists working with Sinatra and asked them as to why, how and where they use Sinatra.

Aaron QuintAaron Quint>> I’ve been using Sinatra all over the place. With Vegas I’ve been using it as a way to provide simple web interfaces to existing code. I’ve also been using it to prototype new application ideas. When not using Sinatra, I’ve been using some of the same basic ideas in JavaScript with Sammy.js. In general, Sinatra is just fun to use as it provides the most direct and clean route to get an idea or a piece of code on the web. Read Aaron’s interview on Sinatra.

Adam KeysAdam Keys>> I’m using Sinatra for two things. For personal stuff, I always reach for Sinatra when I want to prototype an idea. It’s easy to get something in place so I can iterate on the idea quickly. Sinatra is great for deploying prototypes too!

Andrew Neil
Bruno Miranda
Chris Strom
Corey Donohoe
Doug Sparling
Jeremy Evans
Graham Ashton
Hasham Malik
James Edward Gray II
Jeremy Raines
Julio Javier Cicchelli
Karel Minarík
Matt Todd
Nick Plante
Peter Cooper
Piyush Gupta
Sam Goebert
Sau Sheong Chang
Saurabh Purnaye
Twitter

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Follow 10+ Rubyists using Sinatra on Twitter (Reprint)

Note: This first appeared on 24th June 2009 and is being reprinted as the original is not accessible.

What’s Twitter?

Twitter

The New York Times says:

Twitter is a simple messaging service that you’ve either heard about a lot or not at all. Either way, it’s a fun and useful tool, well worth trying if you want to reach potential and existing customers, employees or employers.

List of Rubyists Using Sinatra

This list of over 10 Rubyists using Sinatra, is in alphabetical order, with a link to their Twitter profile. The following list is not intended to be all-inclusive, but it should give you a great start to following some talented Rubyists using Sinatra.

  1. Aaron Quint – aq
  2. Adeel Ahmad – _adeel
  3. Andre Lewis – alewis
  4. Andrew Neil – nelstrom
  5. Arjun Ram – arjunram
  6. August Lilleaas – augustl
  7. Barry Hess – bjhess
  8. Bill Siggelkow – bsiggelkow
  9. Continue reading “Follow 10+ Rubyists using Sinatra on Twitter (Reprint)”

Karel Minarik: How do I learn and master Sinatra? (Reprint)

Note: This is reprint of the blog post that appeared on 13th July 2009, as the original is not accessible.

Welcome to the fourth installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Satish>> Karel Minarik, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based?

Karel MinarikKarel Minarik>> I’m Karel Minarik, web designer and developer living in Prague, Czech Republic. I have graduated in Philosophy, not Computer Science, which may explain why I love Ruby a lot, and why I prefer solving “naming things” over “cache invalidation” problems. I earn my bread by designing interfaces, writing Ruby, JavaScript, HTML/CSS and giving people advice or teaching them new tricks. I blog in undecipherable intervals on Restafari.org and publish code regularly at Github.

Satish>> Are there any pre-requisites for a person to start learning Sinatra?

Karel>> Very few: you just need to know Ruby a little bit. The rest you can and will learn along the way. In fact, Sinatra is wonderful teaching tool to deepen your knowledge of Ruby as a general programming language, web application architectures, HTTP and REST principles, concept of middlewares, and so on.

Sinatra Icon
:)

Continue reading “Karel Minarik: How do I learn and master Sinatra? (Reprint)”

Corey Donohoe: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Note: We are re-printing this blog post that appeared on 6th July 2009, as the original post is not accessible.

Welcome to the first installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Satish>> Corey Donohoe, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based?

Corey DonohoeCorey Donohoe>> I’m Corey Donohoe. I’m based out of Boulder, Colorado – USA. My background is in computer science and system administration though I prefer hacking to either of those labels. I’m a pretty normal dude, I enjoy cycling, music, coffee, micro brews, and all the other awesomeness that my home state has to offer. I’ve been working for Engine Yard since March of ’07 doing everything from app support to internal development. I’m currently 1/2 of our internal integrations team.

Sinatra’s greatest strength is its flexibility

Satish>> Are there any pre-requisites for a person to start learning Sinatra

Corey>> There aren’t any hardcore prerequisites per se; Ruby and experience in a Ruby web framework is a plus. HTTP verbs play a huge role in Sinatra, as well as things like query and post params.

Sinatra Icon

Continue reading “Corey Donohoe: How do I learn and master Sinatra?”

Learn Ruby programming – 57th batch

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s long-awaited and popular Ruby programming course. This is an intensive, online course for beginners that helps you get started with Ruby programming. The course starts on Saturday, 15th Nov. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

Course Fee and Discount

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

Note: If you do not have a PayPal account and would like to pay by credit card on PayPal then do email me at satish [at] rubylearning.org.


Download ‘Advice for Ruby Beginners’ as a .zip file.

Here is what Sandra Randall (Butler), a participant who just graduated, has to say – “You kindly offered me the opportunity to join your Ruby course. I’m new to development and found the course, even though basic for programmers, a little tricky for me. I managed to complete all of the assessments and really learnt a lot. Thank you very much for the opportunity. It has really given me the push I needed to learn Ruby and I’m currently treading my way through both the pickaxe and Agile Development books and enjoying it. I’ve recently been offered a position as a Junior Systems Developer at a local Software house in South Africa – all thanks to the push you gave me which gave me the motivation and drive to get going.”

What’s Ruby?

Ruby

According to http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ – “Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. Ruby’s elegant syntax is natural to read and easy to write.”

Yukihiro Matsumoto, the creator of Ruby, in an interview says –

I believe people want to express themselves when they program. They don’t want to fight with the language. Programming languages must feel natural to programmers. I tried to make people enjoy programming and concentrate on the fun and creative part of programming when they use Ruby.

What Will I Learn?

In the Ruby programming course, you will learn the essential features of Ruby that you will end up using every day. You will also be introduced to Git, GitHub, HTTP concepts, RubyGems, Rack and Heroku.

Some Highlights

RubyLearning’s IRC Channel

Some of the mentors and students hang out at RubyLearning’s IRC (irc.freenode.net) channel (#rubylearning.org) for both technical and non-technical discussions. Everyone benefits with the active discussions on Ruby with the mentors.

Google Hangouts

There is a Hangout Event that is open for students, for drop-in hangouts where students can pair program with mentors or with each other. This is often where you can get help with your system, editor, and general environment. Anything that can help you with your coding environment that you are having problems with are usually discussed interactively here.

Git Repositories

Shared (private) repositories available for those that want to learn git and the revision controlled programming workflow. This allows students that want to collaborate while learning. This is a great way to record your progress while learning Ruby.

eBook

The course is based on the The Ultimate Guide to Ruby Programming eBook. This book is priced at US$ 9.95. However, the Kindle edition of the eBook is available for US$ 6.

Challenges and Side Tracks

This is course material not found in the RubyLearning Study Notes nor in the E-Book! Depending on participation levels, we throw a Ruby coding challenge in the mix, right for the level we are at. We have been known to give out a prize or two for the ‘best’ solution.

Who’s It For?

A beginner with some knowledge of programming.

You can read what past participants / online magazines have to say about the course.

Mentors

Satish Talim, Michael Kohl, Satoshi Asakawa, Victor Goff III and others from the RubyLearning team.

Dates

The course starts on Saturday, 15th Nov. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

How do I register and pay the course fees?

  • You can pay the course fees either by Paypal or send cash via Western Union Money Transfer or by bank transfer (if you are in India). The fees collected helps RubyLearning maintain the site, this Ruby course, the Ruby eBook, and provide quality content to you.

To pay the Course Fee:

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

How does the course work?

For details on how the course works, refer here.

At the end of this course you should have all the knowledge to explore the wonderful world of Ruby on your own.

Remember, the idea is to have fun learning Ruby.

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Learn Ruby programming – 56th batch

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s long-awaited and popular Ruby programming course. This is an intensive, online course for beginners that helps you get started with Ruby programming. The course starts on Saturday, 4th Oct. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

Course Fee and Discount

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 (for the first 10 participants, after which the course fee will be US$ 69.95) by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

Note: If you do not have a PayPal account and would like to pay by credit card on PayPal then do email me at satish [at] rubylearning.org.


Download ‘Advice for Ruby Beginners’ as a .zip file.

Here is what Sandra Randall (Butler), a participant who just graduated, has to say – “You kindly offered me the opportunity to join your Ruby course. I’m new to development and found the course, even though basic for programmers, a little tricky for me. I managed to complete all of the assessments and really learnt a lot. Thank you very much for the opportunity. It has really given me the push I needed to learn Ruby and I’m currently treading my way through both the pickaxe and Agile Development books and enjoying it. I’ve recently been offered a position as a Junior Systems Developer at a local Software house in South Africa – all thanks to the push you gave me which gave me the motivation and drive to get going.”

What’s Ruby?

Ruby

According to http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ – “Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. Ruby’s elegant syntax is natural to read and easy to write.”

Yukihiro Matsumoto, the creator of Ruby, in an interview says –

I believe people want to express themselves when they program. They don’t want to fight with the language. Programming languages must feel natural to programmers. I tried to make people enjoy programming and concentrate on the fun and creative part of programming when they use Ruby.

What Will I Learn?

In the Ruby programming course, you will learn the essential features of Ruby that you will end up using every day. You will also be introduced to Git, GitHub, HTTP concepts, RubyGems, Rack and Heroku.

Some Highlights

RubyLearning’s IRC Channel

Some of the mentors and students hang out at RubyLearning’s IRC (irc.freenode.net) channel (#rubylearning.org) for both technical and non-technical discussions. Everyone benefits with the active discussions on Ruby with the mentors.

Google Hangouts

There is a Hangout Event that is open for students, for drop-in hangouts where students can pair program with mentors or with each other. This is often where you can get help with your system, editor, and general environment. Anything that can help you with your coding environment that you are having problems with are usually discussed interactively here.

Git Repositories

Shared (private) repositories available for those that want to learn git and the revision controlled programming workflow. This allows students that want to collaborate while learning. This is a great way to record your progress while learning Ruby.

eBook

The course is based on the The Ultimate Guide to Ruby Programming eBook. This book is priced at US$ 9.95. However, the Kindle edition of the eBook is available for US$ 6.

Challenges and Side Tracks

This is course material not found in the RubyLearning Study Notes nor in the E-Book! Depending on participation levels, we throw a Ruby coding challenge in the mix, right for the level we are at. We have been known to give out a prize or two for the ‘best’ solution.

Who’s It For?

A beginner with some knowledge of programming.

You can read what past participants / online magazines have to say about the course.

Mentors

Satish Talim, Michael Kohl, Satoshi Asakawa, Victor Goff III and others from the RubyLearning team.

Dates

The course starts on Saturday, 4th Oct. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

How do I register and pay the course fees?

  • You can pay the course fees either by Paypal or send cash via Western Union Money Transfer or by bank transfer (if you are in India). The fees collected helps RubyLearning maintain the site, this Ruby course, the Ruby eBook, and provide quality content to you.

To pay the Course Fee:

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 (for the first 10 participants, after which the course fee will be US$ 69.95) by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

How does the course work?

For details on how the course works, refer here.

At the end of this course you should have all the knowledge to explore the wonderful world of Ruby on your own.

Remember, the idea is to have fun learning Ruby.

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A List of Interviews of Gophers

Since May 2014, I have been busy organizing India’s first-ever Go programming conference “GopherConIndia“. The experience so far has been awesome and I get a chance to interact with Gophers from all over the world. For GopherConIndia, we have been interviewing many Gophers. Below, I have created a list of all the interviews so far.


Gopher Interviews


Satish Manohar Talim

Gopher Interviews

Satish Manohar Talim | 3 items | 0 views

A list of interviews taken for GopherConIndia of Go programming developers and enthusiasts (Gophers).

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  1. 1.

    Dave Cheney

    Dave Cheney

    Dave is a speaker at GopherConIndia 2015.

  2. 2.

    William Kennedy

    William Kennedy

    William is a speaker at GopherConIndia 2015.

  3. 3.

    Jiahua Chen

    Jiahua Chen

    Jiahua is a speaker at GopherConIndia 2015.

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Please do upvote all the interviews that you have liked. Thanks.


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Ruby, Rails companies in Pune, India

In June 2009, we had compiled a list of companies in Pune that execute projects / develop products using Ruby and Ruby on Rails. A lot has changed since then; many companies are no longer existing and some like Josh Software are growing by leaps and bounds! So in case you are looking at outsourcing your work to companies in Pune India, this list should be very helpful.

This time around, I am experimenting with Listly to list out the companies. Here goes:


Ruby, Rails companies in Pune, India


Satish Manohar Talim

Ruby, Rails companies in Pune, India

Satish Manohar Talim | 5 items | 11 views

Here is a list of companies in Pune, India executing projects / developing products using Ruby and Ruby on Rails. Add your suggestion.

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  1. 1.

    Josh Software

    Josh Software

    Josh is India's leading company in building innovative web applications working exclusively in Ruby On Rails since 2007.

  2. 2.

    e-Zest

    e-Zest

  3. 3.

    BigBinary

    BigBinary

    BigBinary is a Ruby on Rails web and mobile development and consulting shop based in Miami, Florida. Founded in 2010, it hosts developers that have contributed to and are part of many Open-Source projects, namely Ruby on Rails.

  4. 5.

    Cube Root Software

    Cube Root Software

    The company was founded in 2009 in Pune India, by highly experienced software professionals. Cube Root offers exclusive Ruby on Rails consulting services, along with ReactJS, Angularjs, backbonejs web front end if necessary. A team passionate about staying on the cutting edge, that cares about your product as their own. They follow agile processes for Project Management and Test Driven Development as development methodology to ensure the delivery of the quality product as quickly as possible.

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If you have worked with any of the above companies, please do comment about your experience with them..

(Disclaimer: I am on Josh’s Board of Directors. However, none of the above companies has ever paid me anything and none requested this post.. just to be clear!)


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Learn Ruby programming – 55th batch

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s long-awaited and popular Ruby programming course. This is an intensive, online course for beginners that helps you get started with Ruby programming. The course starts on Saturday, 30th Aug. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

Course Fee and Discount

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 (for the first 10 participants, after which the course fee will be US$ 69.95) by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

Note: If you do not have a PayPal account and would like to pay by credit card on PayPal then do email me at satish [at] rubylearning.org.


Download ‘Advice for Ruby Beginners’ as a .zip file.

Here is what Sandra Randall (Butler), a participant who just graduated, has to say – “You kindly offered me the opportunity to join your Ruby course. I’m new to development and found the course, even though basic for programmers, a little tricky for me. I managed to complete all of the assessments and really learnt a lot. Thank you very much for the opportunity. It has really given me the push I needed to learn Ruby and I’m currently treading my way through both the pickaxe and Agile Development books and enjoying it. I’ve recently been offered a position as a Junior Systems Developer at a local Software house in South Africa – all thanks to the push you gave me which gave me the motivation and drive to get going.”

What’s Ruby?

Ruby

According to http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ – “Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. Ruby’s elegant syntax is natural to read and easy to write.”

Yukihiro Matsumoto, the creator of Ruby, in an interview says –

I believe people want to express themselves when they program. They don’t want to fight with the language. Programming languages must feel natural to programmers. I tried to make people enjoy programming and concentrate on the fun and creative part of programming when they use Ruby.

What Will I Learn?

In the Ruby programming course, you will learn the essential features of Ruby that you will end up using every day. You will also be introduced to Git, GitHub, HTTP concepts, RubyGems, Rack and Heroku.

Some Highlights

RubyLearning’s IRC Channel

Some of the mentors and students hang out at RubyLearning’s IRC (irc.freenode.net) channel (#rubylearning.org) for both technical and non-technical discussions. Everyone benefits with the active discussions on Ruby with the mentors.

Google Hangouts

There is a Hangout Event that is open for students, for drop-in hangouts where students can pair program with mentors or with each other. This is often where you can get help with your system, editor, and general environment. Anything that can help you with your coding environment that you are having problems with are usually discussed interactively here.

Git Repositories

Shared (private) repositories available for those that want to learn git and the revision controlled programming workflow. This allows students that want to collaborate while learning. This is a great way to record your progress while learning Ruby.

eBook

The course is based on the The Ultimate Guide to Ruby Programming eBook. This book is priced at US$ 9.95. However, the Kindle edition of the eBook is available for US$ 6.

Challenges and Side Tracks

This is course material not found in the RubyLearning Study Notes nor in the E-Book! Depending on participation levels, we throw a Ruby coding challenge in the mix, right for the level we are at. We have been known to give out a prize or two for the ‘best’ solution.

Who’s It For?

A beginner with some knowledge of programming.

You can read what past participants / online magazines have to say about the course.

Mentors

Satish Talim, Michael Kohl, Satoshi Asakawa, Victor Goff III and others from the RubyLearning team.

Dates

The course starts on Saturday, 30th Aug. 2014 and runs for seven weeks.

How do I register and pay the course fees?

  • You can pay the course fees either by Paypal or send cash via Western Union Money Transfer or by bank transfer (if you are in India). The fees collected helps RubyLearning maintain the site, this Ruby course, the Ruby eBook, and provide quality content to you.

To pay the Course Fee:

Please create a new account first and then pay US$ 44.95 (for the first 10 participants, after which the course fee will be US$ 69.95) by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal

How does the course work?

For details on how the course works, refer here.

At the end of this course you should have all the knowledge to explore the wonderful world of Ruby on your own.

Remember, the idea is to have fun learning Ruby.

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A “FREE” Online Course: Build, Deploy Go Web Apps – 2nd batch

Build, Deploy Go Web Apps

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s “Pay if you like“, online course on “Build, Deploy Go Web Apps“. Web-based applications offer many advantages, such as instant access, automatic upgrades, and opportunities for collaboration on a massive scale. However, creating Web applications requires different approaches than traditional applications and involves the integration of numerous technologies. The course topics would hopefully help those that have some programming knowledge to pick up enough Go to get started with building and deploying Go web apps.

Who’s It For?

Anyone with knowledge of some programming language.

Dates

The course starts on Saturday, 9th August 2014 and runs for 6 weeks.

Is the course really free?

A lot of effort and time goes into building such a course and we would really love that you pay at least US$ 9.99 for the course. Since this is a “Pay if you Like” course, you are under no obligation to pay and hence the course would be free for you.

For those who contribute US$ 9.99, we shall email them a copy of the book (.pdf) “How Do I Write And Deploy Simple Web Apps With Go?” – the course is based on this book.

How do I register and pay the course fees?

  • First, create an account on the site and then pay the fees of US$ 9.99 by clicking on the PayPal button Paypal
  • After payment of the fees please send us your name to satish [at] rubylearning [dot] org so that we can send you the above mentioned eBook, which normally takes place within 48 hours.
  • If you want to take the course for free, please just create an account and let us know at the email address mentioned above.

Course Contents

The course teaches you the basics of Go programming and then leads you to build and deploy your own web apps.

The course contents are subject to change.

Mentors

Satish Talim and Victor Goff III from the RubyLearning team.

Josh and Go

JoshSoftware a company driven by enthusiasm and passion and India’s leading company in building innovative web applications – have now embraced Go.

Some Highlights

RubyLearning’s IRC Channel

Some of the mentors and students hang out at RubyLearning’s IRC (irc.freenode.net) channel (#rubylearning.org) for both technical and non-technical discussions. Everyone benefits with the active discussions on Ruby with the mentors.

Google Hangouts

There is a Hangout Event that is open for students, for drop-in hangouts where students can pair program with mentors or with each other. This is often where you can get help with your system, editor, and general environment. Anything that can help you with your coding environment that you are having problems with are usually discussed interactively here.

How does the course work?

For details on how the course works, refer here.

About RubyLearning.org

RubyLearning.org, since 2005, has been helping Programming Newbies go from zero to awesome!

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