Ruby on Rails is like IKEA…whaa?

Recently, I found reading an article by Paul Venezia titled, Fatal abstraction: A bottom-up view of high-level languages, where—if you read between the lines—you can see that Paul just found himself waking up from a coma and it’s no longer 2004.

<blockquote>
    “I may have questioned Perl&#8217;s future now and then, and Perl certainly doesn&#8217;t have the presence it once enjoyed, but the strength of Perl has always been its flexibility. You can do pretty much anything with Perl, and you can do it in a wide variety of ways. Perl&#8217;s core revolves around the idea that there&#8217;s always more than one way to do it. In fact, there may be dozens of ways to do it. <span class="caps">PHP</span> shares a similar trait in that it gives you a large set of tools and leaves the construction up to you.
</blockquote>


<blockquote>
    Ruby, and especially Rails, is the opposite, and Python definitely leans <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/RobbyOnRails?d=7Q72WNTAKBA" border="0"></div>

Continue reading “Ruby on Rails is like IKEA…whaa?”

Ruby on Rails is like IKEA…whaa?

Recently, I found reading an article by Paul Venezia titled, Fatal abstraction: A bottom-up view of high-level languages, where—if you read between the lines—you can see that Paul just found himself waking up from a coma and it’s no longer 2004.

“I may have questioned Perl’s future now and then, and Perl certainly doesn’t have the presence it once enjoyed, but the strength of Perl has always been its flexibility. You can do pretty much anything with Perl, and you can do it in a wide variety of ways. Perl’s core revolves around the idea that there’s always more than one way to do it. In fact, there may be dozens of ways to do it. PHP shares a similar trait in that it gives you a large set of tools and leaves the construction up to you.

Ruby, and especially Rails, is the opposite, and Python definitely leans more in that direction. Essentially, it’s the difference between building a chair from raw lumber and assembling one from IKEA. This isn’t to say there’s anything wrong with assembling from parts, and clearly Ruby and Python are very capable and strong languages. However, they’re not my cup of tea.”

Admittedly, perhaps I’ve been in drinking the “kool-aid” for far too long, but I thought this tired argument has run it’s course.

I take huge offense to comparing Ruby on Rails to IKEA furniture. It’s far easier to build a web application with Ruby on Rails than it is to build an IKEA bookshelf

“When it comes right down to it, I need to know exactly what my code is doing. I’m going to keep an open mind and spend more time on the other side of the fence in the short term. Perhaps I’ll be won over, but it won’t be easy. Trust issues are complicated.”

Paul, I completely understand where you’re coming from. It sounds like you’re dealing with similar trust issues that I had nearly a decade ago. Trust me, it will be okay.

Ruby on Rails isn’t magic. Behind the curtain you’ll find a collection of object-oriented code written in one of the most readable languages in existence.

Experts, Passion, and Pinpoint Control

Quick and random:

The book Ball Four had a big impact on me as a kid. I stumbled across a copy when I was about 12. If you don’t know, Ball Four, written by Jim Bouton and published in 1970, was one of the first big athlete tell-alls (though it seems much tamer these days than it did when it came out…) Anyway, a lot of the book can be read as the story of an articulate outcast trying to understand and navigate the other teammates that he’s basically stuck with.

One passage from the book that’s always stuck with me, is this one, which is Bouton taking about his early career:

When I first came up I thought major-league pitchers had pinpoint control, and I was worried that the best I could do was hit an area about a foot square. Then I found out that’s what everybody meant by pinpoint control, and that I had it.

How great is that? That is a form of impostor syndrome from a major-league pitcher.

It’s a strategy I use to this day — when I’m upset because I’m not sure if I qualify for some vague category like expert, or passionate programmer, or author, or senior developer, I at least consider the possibility that I’m setting the bar for that term too high, and that I’m already that thing.

Because experts look things up.

And senior developers ask for help.

And passionate programmers do other things sometimes.

And pinpoint control is a foot square.

Ruby on Rails developers in New York

We’ve had a number of clients in New York over the years. After a recent trip this last fall to visit clients and attend Cultivate we decided that we should spend more of our time in the city.

In 2014, we’re looking to expand our client base there. If you’re in the NYC area and are looking for an agency that has great Ruby on Rails developers… get in touch.

Ruby on Rails developers in New York

We’ve had a number of clients in New York over the years. After a recent trip this last fall to visit clients and attend Cultivate we decided that we should spend more of our time in the city.

<p>In 2014, we&#8217;re looking to expand our client base there. If you&#8217;re in the <span class="caps">NYC</span> area and are looking for an agency that has great Ruby on Rails developers&#8230; <a href="http://planetargon.com/new-york-ruby-on-rails-development">get in touch</a>.</p><div class="feedflare">